US Archive

  • Can eBooks save journalism?

    Can eBooks save journalism?

    Recent trends in non-fiction eBook publishing, by Tim Dawson, originally published in the December 2013 edition of The Journalist. Five years ago, Rupert Colley was a librarian in Enfield with a long-standing dream of creating a series of popular histories that could be consumed in sixty minutes.  After a decade puzzling how he might realise […]

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  • One to Watch: The digital fortunes of The Dish

    One to Watch: The digital fortunes of The Dish

    Report by Alex Klaushofer. This month saw the launch of a start-up which is being eagerly watched by observers of the media landscape. The Dish – not to be confused with a dreadful Australian film on which I wasted several hours of my life – is the latest venture by Andrew Sullivan, the political blogger […]

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  • More heat than light in the debate about UK press regulation

    More heat than light in the debate about UK press regulation

    Report by Tim Dawson The continuing discussion of the Leveson Inquiry proposals has thrown up a number of abiding mysteries – which were sharply highlighted, but entirely unresolved by at the Soho Sceptics meeting last night at London’s Conway Hall. To consider the case for regulation of the press defined in statute, Nick Cohen and […]

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  • Animal Magic – photo app sells in the thousands

    Animal Magic – photo app sells in the thousands

    Case study by Tim Dawson Perusing Michael ‘Nick’ Nichols’ iPad app is to see his famed work for National Geographic come alive.  There are more than 30 galleries of pictures from assignments over the past three decades, videos and expedition mementos, all are presented with the kind of slick quality that one might expect from […]

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  • Narratively: long, slow journalism from The City that Never Sleeps

    Narratively: long, slow journalism from The City that Never Sleeps

    Report by Alex Klaushofer. The new longform website Narratively has attracted interest ‘beyond our wildest dreams’, according to founder Noah Rosenberg. Even before its launch earlier this month, coverage of the New York-based magazine has been wide, while expressions of support have come via social media from around the world. Such enthusiasm, thinks Rosenberg, is […]

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  • UK hyperlocals suffer from grantfunders’ fixation on innovation

    UK hyperlocals suffer from grantfunders’ fixation on innovation

    Comment by Alex Klaushofer. Earlier this month, the lottery-funded charity Nesta announced the successful bidders for its new grant programme Destination Local. Ten winners emerged out of the 165 hyperlocal projects who applied for funds, including Welsh language paper

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  • Video is the crowd puller of the future

    Video is the crowd puller of the future

    Report by: Tim Dawson Staci Perry – a knitting instructor from Austin, Texas – might not sound like the most typical new media entrepreneur.  But she has used her instructional videos on YouTube to attract 10,000 subscribers, who have viewed her content more than three million times.  Not only that, but the videos act as […]

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  • Cultural inertia threatens newspaper revenues

    Cultural inertia threatens newspaper revenues

    New research from the Pew Center for Excellence in Journalism lays bare the struggle being endured by existing print media and it tries to reposition its business for a digital age.  On the promise on anonymity, Pew researchers persuaded 38 newspapers (mostly in the US), from six different companies, to share a significant body of […]

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  • From frontline to publication – the rise of news e-books

    From frontline to publication – the rise of news e-books

    Report by Alex Klaushofer. It’s comforting, if you’re in the words business, to remember that ‘crisis’ denotes ‘turning point’, a phase of breakdown prior to resolution, as well as the more common meaning of a bad time. And now, with the line between book publishing and journalism becoming increasingly blurred, comes evidence that new opportunties […]

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  • Amazon’s bid to run libraries, and how authors might benefit

    Amazon’s bid to run libraries, and how authors might benefit

    Report by Tim Dawson. Public Lending Right – the scheme that pays authors when their books are borrowed from public libraries – has long been a life-saver for impecunious scribblers. Little wonder then that when, earlier this month, the government announced its intention cut the benefit paid per book issue from 6.25 pence to 6.05 pence […]

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